A Horse Story

ginger

Ginger, a chestnut mare, was a gift from my father when we were living on Brindley Mt., Alabama. She was skittish, but friendly. I rode her in the fields when I could find time away from the children. Dad also gave my boys a Shelton pony with a cart. That’s a story from another time.

One afternoon friends from Huntsville came to visit. We walked to the barn, and at their request I saddled Ginger so they could have a ride. I decided I’d take her around the barn to get her settled and warmed up. We were trotting around for the first time when we rounded the last corner, and there were my friends laughing a talking. Ginger jumped in alarm, and began rearing in fear. You guessed it I lost my seat and my guest lost their desire to ride.

My neighbor had a Tennessee Walking Horse that he offered to let mate with Ginger.
walking horses
We decided to leave them in the field for their romantic interlude instead of interfering in what is natural. Horses are energetic in their amour; they bite, kick, whinny and dance around each other. I had to wonder if Ginger would survive. Then I silently reminded myself they have been successfully mating without anyone’s help for a long time! Ginger produced a beautiful black male colt.

The Tennessee Walking Horse is gaited horse known for its unique four-beat “running walk”. They have a distinctive exaggerated movement called the Big Lick style. The breed is a mix of Narragansett and Canadian Pacer, Standardbred, Thoroughbred, Morgan, and American Saddlebred stock. It is a popular riding horse because of its calm disposition, smooth gaits and sure-footedness.

Shelbyville, Tennessee hosts an annual national celebration that is well attended. If you’re interested visit http://www.twhnc.com/eventcalendar.htm for a calendar of events.

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