Someone in the future is waiting for your post

Interesting post from Josephine Corcoran about what is happening in the UK so that future generations can read our work.  I wonder if they’ll be in touch with you soon?

Someone in the future is waiting for your post.

via Someone in the future is waiting for your post.

Norrköping -a city of contrasts

Norrköping -a city of contrasts

I have been very busy lately… With my vacation:) I have had zero time in front of my computer, not too much time with my camera and a lot of time IRL. Fantastic and enjoyable, I think it is important to take care of the time of in ways that make us reload. It will soon be autumn and a lot of time for “cosy” evenings inside…

In Sweden we have had a lovely weather for the last weeks, hot, sunny, my favorite kind of weather!

Today there was some rain coming up and I went for some sight-seeing in a nearby town, called Norrköping. Norrköping is a town with an industrial history which means there is a lot of old abandoned industrial buildings. Some are used for other purposes like art, museums, coffee places and so on. You can find a lot of great sights. Read more about Norrköping on Wikipedia.

I will guide you through some places with photos I took today.

The industrial area

Some art on the wall

Some art on the wall

Apartments in the old industrial areas

Apartments in the old industrial areas

A play ground in the city

A play ground in the city

Industrial buildings in the background

Industrial buildings in the background

Waterfall in front of the old industrial area

Waterfall in front of the old industrial area

Knäppingsborg -a wonderful place to have a break

Wonderful soft colors

Wonderful soft colors

Coffee?

Coffee?

Roses

Roses in front of the wall

And finally I found some wonderful flowers in the middle of Norrköping city:

Lonely white roses

Lonely white roses

Flowers:)

A mix of flowers:)

Nynäs -a walk in a historic preserve

Nynäs -a walk in a historic preserve

Last week we went to a wonderful place for walking. There is an old castle, wonderful garden, some farming  museum with animals for the children, a wonderful plant shop and above all there are great forest sights to walk in.

The history behind Nynäs is that it first known owner was settled in 1328 and her name was Birgitta Jonsdotter. Since then it have been a lot of owners of the property. In 1969 it was partly sold to the state and in 1984 it was completely sold to the state.

The forest and also the sea “Långmaren”  just beside the castle are a nature preserve with a nature trail that I love. I walk here at least once every summer…

We started up our walk from the vegetable garden (who supplies the restaurant in Nynäs).

Next stop on our walk was on a hill with a wonderful view over the sea “Långmaren”, and also below the hill when we got there.

I  could have brought you some photos of the castle, but there was not time for that, you can see it here.

I got stuck in the wonderful nature and the views, as I always do when I get here. I will end up with some amazing plants I found in the forest, they looks almost magic:-)

In the forest

In the forest

Historic Windsor: 6 Colonial Buildings

It all started with the Hawkesbury River.

Flowing to the west of  Sydney,  Australia,  this mighty river has huge floods.   Engulfing  the surrounding countryside the river’s gift is rich fertile farming  soil.

This floodplain became the market garden for colonial Sydney.   The then Governor of New South Wales,  Governor Macquarie,  established several towns here known as the Macquarie Towns.

Two of these were Windsor and Richmond.

Libby and I went to Windsor searching for colonial history and hit the jack-pot.   At lunch-time we wandered down the street looking for ‘foodie’ places.

‘There’s the oldest pub in Australia!’  announced  Libby.

What a find!

image

Still standing after being established by Richard Fitzgerald as a purpose-built Inn in 1815 the Macquarie Arms was just like the old pubs I visited in London.

Complete with low doorways as people were shorter back then.

image

image

How many feet have trodden over this worn entrance?

image

I wonder if a few of them were bushrangers.

Sipping beer and looking around the original cedar-panelled rooms and winding staircase I wonder what schemes were hatched over a few schooners of cleansing ale.

image

image

Apparently one wild colonial lad was born in Windsor.   Captain Thunderbolt made his entrance into the world here in 1835.  An expert horseman he stole thousands of pounds worth of prize racehorses and evaded capture for many years.

Did he return to his birthplace to bend an elbow?  We will never know.

However, we do know the high mark of the worst Hawkesbury River flood on record (1867).   A plaque beside the pub gives me pause when I see how far it is from the river today.

image

image

More fascinating discoveries await in the Hawkesbury Regional Museum.

Boomerangs, throwing sticks and axe heads  give us some idea of the life of the Darkinjung, Darug, Eaora and Kuringgai  Aboriginal people who lived here for thousands of years.

Grim reminders of our convict past such as leg irons and balls and chains are quite eerie.

image

image

Gangs of chained convicts worked on roads and buildings.   These sinister relics bring this back to life.

Leaving the convicts behind we walk along Thompson Square past Howes House built in 1827 for free settler,  John Howe,  who was Chief Constable of the town for some years.

image

Beside this is the Doctors House which was the residence for a series of doctors until 1992.

image

image

Across from the Macquarie Arms beautifully restored shops and business places still stand.

image

A humble colonial cottage sits just outside the town centre.

image

Loder House in the Windsor Mall was built in 1834 for George Loder, a free settler, who never lived in it as he died the year it was built.

image

More beautiful photographs of Windsor can be found on Libby’s blog.

Finally,  Libby and I venture a little further from the CBD to visit St. Matthew’s Anglican church (1817).

image

Designed by the ex-convict Sir Francis Greenway (transported for forgery) the church has stained glass windows and a beautiful blue panelled ceiling.

image

image

Headstones of all kinds are found in the churchyard – from the solid and ornate to extremely humble metal plaques.

image

image

image

Saddest of all are the unmarked graves.  Some souls disappear without a trace.

 

Historic Windsor breathes history.

The Hawkesbury River floodplain has provided food for people for thousands of years and countless stories remain to be uncovered from this area.

Captain Thunderbolt rides through my imagination and is that the distant clink of  leg irons I can hear?   And didgeridoos?

 

Thanks for reading my post.  Happy travels.

Maria.

 

 

 

Watertown, Tennessee, Part 1

I went for a weekend visit with my brother and sister-in-law, Mike and Gloria Dixon. They live in a beautiful town called Watertown. I want to tell you a little about the town and my visit.

After the Revolutionary War, the federal and nine state governments awarded land grants to citizens and soldiers for services rendered. Colonel Archibald Lytle and his brother William were given land that is now known as Watertown. Wilson L. Waters moved into the area in late 1700’s. In 1845 the post office moved from nearby Three Forks to Wilson’s store. Waters added a sawmill, gristmill and blacksmith shop. Eventually his 400-acre farm became known as Watertown.

When the Nashville and Knoxville Railroad built a depot in Watertown in 1885, it became the hub of business in the area. The increased business led to a doubling of the village’s size. A fire in 1903 destroyed the wood structures of the village, and many businesses. Rebuilding resulted in a town square surrounded by brick buildings; it remains the core of the current city of Watertown.

The town has been the site of several music videos, television episodes and motion picture productions throughout its history. Visit http://www.watertowntn.com/ to see a listing. Here’s one I like http://youtu.be/_EL3kSwh-h0

Songwriter Tom T. Hall wrote these lyrics about Watertown, Tennessee:
I got a little farm and it’s mostly rock
It ain’t too much but it’s all I got
Bluebirds singing in the evergreen trees
In Watertown Tennessee
Hey, Watertown Tennessee
People in Watertown will never do die
When they reach a hundred they can truly fly
Sail into heaven on a southerly breeze
In Watertown Tennessee
Hey, Watertown Tennessee
I had me an outhouse down by the creek
Prettiest outhouse you ever did see
Flood came along now I’m up the creek
In Watertown Tennessee
Hey, Watertown Tennessee
Well, a big old red hawk circling around
Looking for a chicken down here on the ground
Sometimes he gets as high as me
In Watertown Tennessee
Hey, Watertown Tennessee
When I get to heaven if I ever do die
I’m a gonna cut me a hole in the sky
Sittin’ in a mansion and all I’ll see
Is Watertown Tennessee
Hey, Watertown Tennessee
Now if you want to be famous and you want to be rich
People in Watertown taught me a trick I’m gonna tell it
If I stay around long, whoops, that’s the end of this song
Called Watertown Tennessee

Times up today. Come back tomorrow and I’ll tell you some intimate details of Watertown.

Oregon, My Memories Part II

I can’t actually say I remember the first time I went to the beach in Seaside, Oregon. That seems like a life time ago. I know people say that, you think what is a life time ago? For me a life time ago is thirty two years. The first time I know it was possible for me to go to the beach was at the age of eight. The Pacific Ocean is a Monster of water. You can barely hear yourself think, if you try holding a conversation while you walk by the water you have to nearly yell.

I recently told someone about the Pacific Ocean and described it to them this way: If the sky is grey the ocean will be grey. If the sky is clear blue the ocean will be blue. The water is so clear and clean you can see to the bottom in just a couple of feet. The one thing to be careful about is the Undertoe. Standing in the water even just ankle deep you can feel the pull of the water. You can also feel yourself sinking into the sand; this is all part of the Undertoe. It is an amazing experience to see, as long as you don’t get caught in it.

The other thing about the Pacific Ocean is it is freezing cold. Yes that’s right very cold and we would still go wading in the water. Some people would go surfing, crazy if you ask me. I remember one night after a church service we all decided to go out to eat then around midnight we went wading in the Ocean. I don’t mean ankle deep we were in waist deep. This was in the middle of winter so it was about forty or forty five degrees, that meant the Ocean was in the upper twenties or very low thirties. You are probably thinking what were they doing? Not thinking, we were kids having fun and freezing!!

May God bless you and may your bones bleach in the sands. ~Captain Lawrence

May God bless you and may your bones bleach in the sands. ~Captain Lawrence

There is a beach in Oregon close to Seaside where my siblings and I first drove a car. Warrenton is a very small town about the size of Seaside. This is where the ship Peter Iredale ran aground on October 25, 1906. The ship was built by Peter Iredale & Port in 1890 and named after Peter Iredale.

Hail to the rolling seas and the birds who ride the breeze Hail to the House of Iredale,  Long may the ocean rise Anticipation fill the skies and long may the wind blow in our sail.

Hail to the rolling seas and the birds who ride the breeze Hail to the House of Iredale,
Long may the ocean rise Anticipation fill the skies
and long may the wind blow in our sail.

I love this shipwreck. I would go and sit for hours just watching the waves as they crashed in around it. Think about how that can relate to us and life. Here is this huge steel bark ship and time and water is working against it. It is still holding on, standing strong. That is what we have to do, no matter what comes our way we stand strong and hold on. I still hold on to the image of this ship in my mind and use it when I am struggling with something. I used it during a journaling course I took. For me Peter Iredale is strength and safety.

And now her rusting hull still stands Where timeless waters shift their sands Still heading on a course thats north and true Forever pointing toward the Bar To show lost sailors where they are And that Cape of Dissappointment in her view.

And now her rusting hull still stands Where timeless waters shift their sands Still heading on a course thats north and true
Forever pointing toward the Bar To show lost sailors where they are And that Cape of Disappointment in her view.

Every time we went to Fort Stevens my dad read this sign to all of us~

Every time we went to Fort Stevens my dad read this sign to all of us~

As my family and I were leaving Oregon to move to North Carolina I will never forget our last visits to Fort Stevens. It is an amazing Fortress originally made (during the Civil War 1861-1865) of earth; five sided with bastions at each corner and a salient point on the water side. The coolest part was the deep wet moat they built around the entire Fortress. This is so much like a castle it would have been kind of awesome to be a fly on the wall, so to speak.

Sometimes it takes a different vantage point to realize just how close to spectacular you really are~

Sometimes it takes a different vantage point to realize just how close to spectacular you really are~

In 1897 Fort Stevens underwent a massive re-fortification program to improve coastal defense that resulted in the construction of 8 Endicott Period concrete batteries around the original site. The Fortress was manned by the National Guard during World War I by the twenties the number of enlisted men had deteriorated. Around 1935 the number of men started increasing. Fort Stevens had the distinction of being the only stateside Fort attacked by the enemy since the the War of 1812 when a Japanese submarine fired 17 shells close to the fort on June 21, 1942. They however were unable to return fire because the submarine was out of range of Fort Stevens’ obsolete guns. The submarine left without inflicting any damage.  It is still standing today of course. Oregon State Parks leased the Old Fort area in 1975 and is making upgrades to the structures to keep them standing. Everything that we saw on our visits there was made of cement. There were dark rooms for ‘Gunners’, ‘Shells’, ‘Latrine’, etc. Your voice echoed in every room. It wasn’t creepy it was just dark and very, very quiet. Fort Stevens is a large place, without a flash light you can’t see inside very well; you have a lot of ground to cover.

My brother and I always pretended we were in a war when we went to visit Fort Stevens~

My brother and I always pretended we were in a war when we went to visit Fort Stevens~

This is part of the interior of Battery Russell~

This is part of the interior of Battery Russell~

Along with Fort Stevens, actually on the same property, you have Battery Russell. When I lived in Oregon I don’t think I really understood the difference between Battery Russell and Fort Stevens. Battery Russell was named for Brigadier General David A. Russell, who served with the U.S. 4th Infantry Regiment in the Oregon Territory and commanded Fort Yamhill before he was killed in action during the Civil War.

This is just one of the many gun emplacements~

This is just one of the many gun emplacements~

Fort Clatsop Canoe landing~

Fort Clatsop Canoe landing~

The one I really liked the most I think was Fort Clatsop. This Fort is part of the Lewis and Clark expedition. If you did not get a chance to read my post on Oregon, My Memories Part I in there I mention the Salt Cairns. Fort Clatsop was built by Lewis and Clark so they could weather the winter. The Fort was just recently rebuilt after a fire destroyed it in 2006. (For further interest in Lewis & Clark here is a link to their Journals)

There are guided tours, you are asked to dress in layors., weather is always a factor in Oregon, most definitely bring a flash light. For picttures be sure you use the flash.

There are guided tours, you are asked to dress in layers, weather is always a factor in Oregon. Most definitely bring a flash light, for pictures be sure you use the flash.

When my siblings and I visited it we found it to be the most authentic. If my memory serves it looked almost as if people had just got up and left the Fort. There were wood logs set out for stools. Fires set just needing a match to light them; spickets ready for roasting game and bundles of branches near the doors for firewood.

A little different view of my hometown and a few surrounding cities. These are places I love and grew up with. I enjoyed sharing them with you and hope you enjoyed reading about them. I would love to hear about some favorite places you had growing up? Drop me a comment… 😀

A “report” from the celebrating of midsummer

I have written a post in my other blog with photos from my midsummer trip to Åland, which is an island between Sweden and Finland.

Se the post here: Celebrating midsummer in Åland